Anti-Semitism

ANTI-SEMITISM 10

1

Feudalism is an integration of legal and military practices thathappened in the medieval Europe.

2

The Catholic Church was a powerful institution, which traced itshistory to Jesus Christ. It played a significantrole in Europe.

3

The European Christians intended to assimilate them and become partof the kingdom. It would bring more benefits such as the advancedeconomy in the territories.

4

The Jews had a difficult time in Europe during the medieval ages.They were viewed differently.

5

Christians and Jews had different doctrines of religion. Itapparently made them have differently.

6 (class discussion)

7

It is a system of duties and rights socially based on personalrelationships and land tenure.

8

It meant that the dominant religion in Europe was Christianity. Itwas a monotheistic religion with powerful influence.

9

Jews were looked down upon, and they facedstigma. Some Christians opposed them while other supported theirsettlement in Europe.

10

The bishop wanted to safeguard the Jews by telling them to settle inSpeyer. He thought they would want to stay there after their templewas destroyed ad they were refugees.

11

The Jews needed refuge, and that is howthey accepted to settle in Speyer but then moved afterward.

12

The Bishop offered them safety and help although not everyone wasready to take them in the society.

13

The Jews expected Bishop Rudiger to watch, help and guard them. Hewas also to ensure their rights are observed.

14

The fact that the charter was about protecting their rights meantthat they were not guaranteed if there wasno one to protect them.

15 (class discussion)

16

The attitude of elites and small class towardsJews was influenced by Christianity. They stigmatized Jews andharassed them for a long time.

17

Christian leaders made an effort of showing how the Jews could settledown and participate in the society. They also protected them fromviolent attackers.

18

Jews had to engage in economic activities,but it was hard for them to get jobs due to stigma.

19

City dwellers and peasants had to accept the presence of Jews. Thereare those who supported them while other resented their occupancy.

20

It was possible to achieve cohesion, butthere it was not for long until resistance towards the Jews began.

21

These myths shared the same concepts when they are criticallyanalyzed. However, some people may have perceived them differently.

22

Each myth has an origin inspired by the history and general life ofthe medieval era.

23

Various reactions of negativity and support weretriggered among Christians and Jews. Some people wereopponents others were negative about the myths.

24

They contributed their perceptions, which influenced and shaped thedirection these tales took.

25

They guided the rest of the Christians on how to conduct themselves.They also shaped and determined on how to handle the influence ofmyths among the people.

26

New attitude improved and Jews were not perceived with alittle opinion and stigma as it used to be in the past.Judaism became more acceptable and in Europe than it was previously.

27

Jews were distinguished mainly from the pointed hat that they wore.The women also had to cover their heads with a form of headscarfshaped in a particular way.

28

It was successful in getting leaders accept this differentway because they continued to wear even in the later years. It becamea practice in Judaism.

29

European Christians lost their lives in this catastrophe. Itstrengthened their faith in Christianity too. They also believed thatGod’s wrath punished them.

30

People in the Middle East and North Africa perceive the plague asbioterrorism. Some terrorist groups fromthese regions have attempted to perpetrate such attacks to people.

31

He tries to derive an insight of how the various responses reflectthese areas.

32

Subordinate classes looked down upon Jews. As for the elites, theyresented them because of their methods and how the elites looked downupon other people of lower classes.

33

It precisely meant they were victims to other people such asChristians. Jews were exploited for shortterm gains.

34

The persecution of the Black Death was great, andafter that, the Jews were driven out of England, France, Italy, andthey spread in various places.

35

They covered toomany places but mainly in Slavic kingdoms. They found anatural refuge in these countrieswith benevolent rulers. It enabled them to achieve reasonableprosperity.

36

Competition of resources reduced among Christian and Jews. Those whodid not want Jews also felt comfortable after they left.

37

Christianity and papacy had a lot of challenges and schism,and its leadership became unstable and mistrusted by the people.

38

Because they felt safe since the term dhimmi means protected citizenor person

39

Jews were accepted in the society. It wascalled the golden age of Jewish culture.

40

The Christians and Jews were expelled fromMorocco and Islamic Spain.

41

They brought problems, which caused the Jews and Christians to beexpelled from Spain.

42

He was a cleric in Spain, and he was ananti-Semitic agitator. He is known as the moverof pogroms.

43

Since Martinez was against the Jews riots were supported by fellowanti-Jews.

44

The Jews faced massacre through persecutions and other decided toconvert to Catholicism.

45

Since they joined Christianity, they became accepted in the societyand their lives changed.

46

The Spanish Inquisition was a system seeking to punish Jews heretics.

47

The Jews were expelled not to re- Judaize the converses. The Jewishmoney was also targeted.

48

Some people wanted to acquire the Jews’wealth the easiest way was expulsion.

49

Other countries were Italy, regions of German and England.

50

Jews found a safe settlement and acceptancein the kingdoms of Slavic.

51

Martin Luther King criticized how Catholicism perceived sacrament.

52

Pope Leo X excommunicated Martin Lutherbecause his refused to recant his writing.

53

Emperor Charles V did not want to excommunicate Martin Luther sincethe Pope will lack a rival.

54

John Huss’ prophesy about Martin Luther saved him from his fate.

55

Martin Luther influenced of Jews to become Christians.

56

In the beginning, Martin Luther was asympathizer of the Jews.

57

Peasants understood that Martin Luther sympathized with them.

58

He told them that they deserved to be free from the bondage ofoppression.

59

Peasants conflicted with their overloads during their demand forfreedom.

60

These meetings were to reduce or control tension between Protestantsand Jews.

61

He was a widely sought scholar on views of religion since he was veryeducated.

62

At first, he was a sympathizer but laterchanged he began seeing them differently.

63

Martin Luther eventually stated Jews were not as he had perceivedthem.

References:

Goldstein, P. (2011) a convenient hatred: A Historyof .NewYork:Facing History and Ourselves