Benchmark Assignment Evidence-Based Practice, Diabetes

BENCHMARK ASSIGNMENT 5

BenchmarkAssignment: Evidence-Based Practice, Diabetes

BenchmarkAssignment: Evidence-Based Practice, Diabetes

Diabetesis a condition that is common to both adults and children, and itarises as a result of the inability of the body to process food andutilizes it as energy. In the actual sense, some of the food that isconsumed should be transformed into glucose or sugar and utilizedefficiently by the body as energy. Insulin is a hormone that isproduced by pancreases, and it is located close to the stomach itaids in the absorption of glucose into the body cells via theintestinal linings. Consequently, when one has diabetes, it ispossible that the production of insulin is low, or the process ofglucose metabolism in the body is defective. Therefore, the purposeof the paper is to examine a particular intervention for thetreatment of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) in adults.

ArticleSummary

Khanet al. (2015) suggested that for the adult patients who have beendiagnosed with diabetes mellitus, the initial therapeuticconcentrations are directed towards the prevention of complicationsthat are triggered by hyperglycemia. When Khan etal.(2015) reviewed the United States statistics, he observed that about57.9% of patients with diabetes had one or several complications thatare closely related to the disease, and 14.3% had three or even more.In tandem with that, Khan etal.(2015) recommended the control of glycemia as the treatment thathelps to prevent the development of, and or, the increases ofcomplications that are linked to the microvascular effect ofdiabetes.

Discussion

Oneof the clinical interventions that can be utilized to treat diabetesis the Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose-SMBG, which assists diabeticpatients in the short-term control of glycemia. In essence, SMBG isvital for both the patients and the physicians, since it helps toassess the effect of medication, food, and stress as well as theactivity on blood glucose levels in the body (Levine etal.,2016). Similarly, in adult patients who are suffering frominsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus type 2 and type 1 diabetesmellitus, the clinical trials that have been conducted show that SMBGhas a critical role in the effective glycemia control. That isbecause it can regulate insulin doses by monitoring for, and stoppingasymptomatic hypoglycemia together with preprandial and postprandialhyperglycemia (Khan etal.,2015).

Thenature of medication therapy, risk of hypoglycemia, and therequirement for short-term adjustment of therapy substantiallydetermine the frequency of SMBG. With regards to the recent AmericanDiabetes Association (ADA), patients who have diabetes should monitortheir glucose level at least three times a day (Khan etal.,2015). For instance, patients who use basal-bolus regimens mustself-monitor before taking any meal and during bed time, which bringsit close to four times a day. However, there are patients who requireconstant monitoring of postprandial and preprandial reading.Additionally, patients who have gestational diabetes, and are takinginsulin for treatment, should be advised to monitor their bloodglucose level not less than three times a day (Khan etal.,2015).

Fromthe study of Semenkovich etal.(2015), it was validated that patients with diabetes requireeducation with regards to real-time glucose values, as that can helpthem make a decision on the type of food they take at any particularmoment. Due to advancement in technology, some companies have deviseda tool known as the continuous glucose control (CGM) which helps tomeasure the interstitial glucose. The research that has beenconducted using the device indicates that it can improve glycemiccontrol without introducing the risk of hypoglycemia. Hence,Semenkovich etal.(2015) concluded that calibration of continuous glucose controlrequires that patients should check their blood glucose level, andthat echoed the assertions of Khan etal.(2015) on the need for constant glucose level management in adults.

Patientswho suffer from type 2 DM and utilize insulin to self-monitor thelevels of their blood glucose are informed that the evidence tosupport the efficacy of that practice is inconclusive. The findingfrom the initial research by Levine etal.(2016) suggested that SMBG in type 2 DM patients can result in thereduction of HbA1c. Alternatively, for the patients who are subjectedto other interventions such as health-improving behavior, includingdiet and exercises, it is hard to evaluate the effectiveness of SMBG(Levine etal.,2016). The research concluded that some of the follow-up studiesmeant to rectify that were not able to establish significantimprovement in glycemic control after a period of 12 months itchallenged the efficiency of glucose level control proposed by Khanetal(2015). According to the instructions from the ADA and AmericanAssociation of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), however, Khan etal(2015) concluded that there is a need to establish individual goalsfor patients on the identified blood glucose level.

Conclusion

Diabetesis a condition that is common to both adults and children, and itarises as a result of the inability of the body to process food andutilizes it as energy. Similarly, for adult patients who have beendiagnosed with diabetes mellitus, the initial therapeuticconcentrations are directed towards the prevention of complicationsthat are triggered by hyperglycemia. Specifically, one of theclinical interventions that can be utilized to treat diabetes is theSelf-Monitoring of Blood Glucose-SMBG, which assists adult diabeticpatients in the short-term control of glycemia. Moreover, the natureof medication therapy, risk of hypoglycemia, and the requirement forshort-term adjustment of therapy significantly determine thefrequency of SMBG.

References

Khan,N. A., Ghali, W. A., Cagliero, E., Nathan, D. M., Jones, S. B., &ampMulder, J. E. (2015). Perioperative management of blood glucose inadults with diabetes mellitus. Anesthesiaand Clinical Research, 12(4),154-161.

Levine,J. C., Burns, E., Whittle, J., Fleming, R., Knudson, P., Flax, S., &ampLeventhal, H. (2016). Randomized trial of technology-assistedself-monitoring of blood glucose by low-income seniors: improvedglycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Journalof Behavioral Medicine,27(8),1-8.

Semenkovich,K., Brown, M. E., Svrakic, D. M., &amp Lustman, P. J. (2015).Depression in type 2 diabetes mellitus: prevalence, impact, andtreatment. Drugs,75(6),577-587.