Do students who experience large gains in standardized test scores earn more in the Labor-Market than their peers who didn`t experience large gains?

ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION 1

Do students who experience large gains in standardized test scoresearn more in the Labor-Market than their peers who didn’texperience large gains?

Research Question: Do students who experience large gains instandardized test scores earn more in the Labor-Market than theirpeers who didn’t experience large gains?

Schwartz, E., Stiefel, L., and Wiswall, M. (2013). Do Small SchoolImprove Performance in Large Urban Districts? Causal Evidence fromNew York City. Journal of Urban Economics, 77(2013) 27-40.

Schwartz et al. note in this article that the academic achievement ofUnited States Elementary School has enhanced over the last epoch.This is because the job market demands high standard test scoresamong secondary student. Using a rich organizational dataset fornumerous cohorts of the student and distance between student dwellingand school to implement for endogenous school selection, the authorsof this article find a heterogeneity in school effect. Hence, theymaintain that newly small school have greater positive impact onperformance, hence high chances of job market.

Boccanfuso et al. (2014). Quality ofEducation and the Labor Market in the Developing Countries: Evidencefrom and Education reform in Senegal. Internet resource.

Education is extensively painstaking as a critical issue in thecommercial and social development of a country. This articlescrutinizes the primary effect of education quality on labor marketoutcomes in the developing countries. Boccanfuso and his colleaguesfind that young skilled workers know-how a nine percentage-pointservice gain about the older workers. Also, they are more likely tohave better jobs. This indicates that there is a reduction in themismatch between the quality of high skilled labor demanded andsupplied. In this case, school quality education is emerging as animportant issue in developing countries.

Rouse, C., and Barrow, L. (2006). US Elementary and SecondarySchools: Equalizing Opportunity of Replicating the Status Quo.Economics of Education, 16:2.

According to the authors of this article, they argue that schoolingpays off generously in the United States. Also, children fromlow-income families accomplish fewer education than children fromadditional privileged families. In this article, Cecilia Elena Rouseand Lisa Barrow examine why the household contextual is so powerfullylinked to education. The writers show that domestic socioeconomicstatus touches such enlightening outcomes as test scores, scorepreservation, and high school completion and that level of educationstrongly affects adult wages. They then go on to ask why childrenfrom more privileged families get additional or better education thanthose from fewer privileged families. For low-income students,greater mental costs, the cost of predetermined income, and derivingcosts all help to elucidate why these pupils achieve less schoolingthan more advantaged children. Based on the research evidence, thisarticle is important toward this study in the sense that it evaluatedthe perspective market demand for that student will less and hightest scores.

Hanushek, E., and Rivkin S. (2007). Pay, Working Conditions. AndTeacher Quality. Vol. 17 (1).

This article reveals that salary and working affect thequality of instruction in class. Hanushek and Rivkin examine that, inthe contemporary world, average wages differ little, however, betweenurban and suburban districts. This quite because, employed conditionsin municipal and residential societies differ considerably, withmunicipal teachers broadcasting far less commissioner and parentalsupport, lesser materials, and greater student difficulties.Difficult working circumstances may drive abundant of the differencein turnover of teachers and the transmission of teachers acrossschools. Similarly, salary and labor marketplace is pretentious bythe quality of teachers turn over the student accomplishment. On theother hand, this articles shows that, with the current workingcondition, labor markets favor student who possesses high testsscores and this has transform the hiring and training of mosteffective teachers to provide new policies to enhance highperformance.

Murphy, K., and Peltzman, S. (2000).The Effects of School Qualityon the Youth Labor Market. [Online] Available fromhttps://www.chicagobooth.edu/assests/stigler/162.pdf

This article discusses the quality of education received by childrenaffect their performance when they enter the labor market. Accordingto the recent research suggest that the effect of school quality onthe job market measures quality with inputs. In this case, both theschool inputs-labor market and the education production literatureare unsettled. Besides, schooling effects are significant inmagnitude as well as statistically.

Currie, J, and Thomas, D. (2001). Early Test Scores, SchoolQuality and SES: Long-Run Effects on the Wage and EmploymentOutcomes. Worker Wellbeing in a Changing Labor Market,Vol. 20, 103-132.

According to this article, much of the contemporary debateover education policies centers on raising test scores to of greatereffect in the labor market. The authors of this article note thatmany employers care about test scores because of numerous studiesthat have demonstrated the links between children’s scores on theachievement test, future wages, and employment probabilities. Judgedby evidence, children with lower test scores are demanded in thelabor market. However, they might have been affecting by the economicbackground where they come from.

OUTLINE

TOPIC: Do students who experience large gains in standardized testscores earn more in the Labor-Market than their peers who didn’texperience large gains?

  1. Abstract

    1. Description of the topic problem

    2. Objective of the research

    3. Thesis statement

  2. Literature review

    1. The General Effect of the high standard score on job market

    2. Does low standard score individuals earn less in the labor market

    3. Evidence from the sources on the statistics of job employment.

  3. Conclusion

    1. Re-stating of the thesis statement or the objective of the research

    2. Importance and recommendation of the research topic problem.

    3. Areas of future research

References

Boccanfuso et al. (2014). Quality of Education and the LaborMarket in the Developing Countries: Evidence from and Educationreform in Senegal. Internet resource.

Currie, J, and Thomas, D. (2001). Early Test Scores, School Qualityand SES: Long-Run Effects on the Wage and Employment Outcomes. WorkerWellbeing in a Changing Labor Market, Vol. 20, 103-132

Hanushek, E., and Rivkin S. (2007). Pay, Working Conditions. AndTeacher Quality. Vol. 17 (1).

Murphy, K., and Peltzman, S. (2000).The Effects of School Quality onthe Youth Labor Market. [Online] Available fromhttps://www.chicagobooth.edu/assests/stigler/162.pdf

Rouse, C., and Barrow, L. (2006). US Elementary and SecondarySchools: Equalizing Opportunity of Replicating the Status Quo.Economics of Education, 16:2

Schwartz, E., Stiefel, L., and Wiswall, M. (2013). Do Small SchoolImprove Performance in Large Urban Districts? Causal Evidence fromNew York City. Journal of Urban Economics, 77 (2013) 27-40