Impacts of Mass Media on juvenile violence in the United States

Impactsof Mass Media on juvenile violence in the United States

Themass media has influenced juvenile violence in the United States inthat violent content depicted on television have impacted aggressivebehavior in youths. Teenagers who watch violent programs becomepassive recipients of whatever is being displayed on the screens, andthey could easily imitate such acts thus contributing to violence(Ferguson &amp Olson, 2014).

Socialmedia platforms have created an avenue for extremist groups tocapture unsuspecting juveniles and spread violent ideologies thatcause hatred towards particular people within the population.Terrorists, for instance, have used this platform to spread harmfulideas about the United States. If not properly rehabilitated, thesejuveniles can carry the same beliefs into their adulthood.

Juvenilescan have unlimited access to violent contents on the internet. This tcan result in adverse behavior changes. Some people have used theInternet to spread propaganda and hateful messages and content whichmay cause anger and thus encourage young people to develop violentbehaviors.

Inthe United States, the mass media has enabled juveniles to accessparticular types of music with gangsta and violent contents. If aminor establishes that his or her model rapper is linked withcriminal activity, there is a high probability that they would likeviolence, crime, and music (McGinty, Webster, Jarlenski &amp Barry,2014). There are two options in such a case, the juvenile can abandonhis or her music choice or continue to deepen his relationship withthe gangsta, and this can result in the development of criminalbehavior.

Thesocial media does not provide a safe environment or platform forjuveniles to learn essential life skills that can enable them tobecome responsible citizens. Many of the proclaimed counselor andtutors in the social media do not have the necessary qualificationand may end up misleading teenagers.

References

Ferguson,C. J., &amp Olson, C. K. (2014). Video game violence uses among&quotvulnerable&quot populations: The impact of violent games ondelinquency and bullying among children with clinically elevateddepression or attention deficit symptoms. Journalof youth and adolescence,&nbsp43(1),127-136.

McGinty,E. E., Webster, D. W., Jarlenski, M., &amp Barry, C. L. (2014). Newsmedia framing of serious mental illness and gun violence in theUnited States, 1997-2012.&nbspAmericanjournal of public health,&nbsp104(3),406-413.