Implementation Plan for Transformational Change

ImplementationPlan for Transformational Change

ImplementationPlan for Transformational Change

Informingthe employees that their efforts may no longer be needed in thecompany will be one of the most problematic scenarios that themanagement is yet to experience. It will be difficult for theaffected staff members to understand the reason for the layoff(Clegg,2015).This last section will help as a guide to assist the management inmaneuvering through the process of downsizing with respect anddignity for both the parting and the remaining employees.

Majorimplementation steps

1.Executive Support for the Change

Itwill be vital that administration expresses support for the layoffand proves this when interacting and communicating with staff. Whenthe workers see their managers supporting the process, they will beable to develop a level of comfort for the actions involved in thedismissal (Clegg,2015).

2.Creating Instance for Change

Nomember of staff may want to participate in the change process withoutvalidation. Therefore, it will be significant to create a scenario tosupport the need for change. It may arise from various sources,including data gathered on rates of defect, client satisfactionsurveys, and budget pressures (Chang,2016).

3.Worker Involvement

Thechange effort will have to involve staffs at some level. Structuraltransformation, whether small or large, must be communicated andexplained, particularly those that that may affect how the personnelconducts their roles (Harmon,2014).

4.Notifying personnel about the Change

Communicationprocess needs to be logical and structured. Workers stand a chance ofmistreatment when the management fails to inform them regardingplanned changes. In a situation of poor notification through rumors,there can be resistance to the layoff (Clegg,2015).However, being positive in communication can lessen opposition andmake staffs feel that they are equally important.

Criteriafor Success

Therewill be a number of concerns that will have to be considered onredundancy process. First, the management will have to come up witha dismissal documentation that will outline the justification behindthe decision. The human resource manager will use the document tosupport details in employee letters (Smith,2014).Secondly, HRM will have to review facts in worksheets to certify thatall provisions of Collective Bargaining Agreement are considered. Incertain circumstances, it will be significant for the review to bedone prior to the time when the employees are informed. Third, theboard officials will have to meet with a human resource consultant soas to discuss any concerns, questions, or issues before commencingthe communication. It may assist the company to frame goodapproaches for assembling all essential possessions for the affectedstaff. Fourth, there will be the need to evaluate issues of changemanagement that may cause an impact on the remaining team (Harmon,2014).For instance, the roles that may have been finished by the positionsto be terminated will need to be moved. Fifth, the management willhave to alert the employees who are targeted for dismissal.Conventionally, an organization must always provide at least fourweeks for collective bargaining (Wan,2013). Sixth, the board officials will need to meet with the wholeworkforce to offer the justification and respond to any emergentquestions (Hayes,2014).It has to be done early enough after the meeting. Lastly, it will becrucial that the management constantly follows up with employeesbefore and after the period of downsizing to guarantee that everymatter is addressed swiftly (Rosemann&amp vom Brocke, 2015).

Rollout

Inmost occasions, employees are faced with risks in the course ofchange implementation. The obstacles can arise from employees ordepartments. Whenever an eventuality occurs, management has the roleof dealing with difficult or resistant employees. The personnel whoare affected may become defensive, resistant, and even bargain tohave another chance. Some of them may threaten the organization thatthey want to launch a formal action such as court case to retaliateagainst the idea of dismissal (Jeston&amp Nelis, 2014).They may turn to be possessively irritated with the management asthey contemplate the aftermaths arising from the job loss. The worseof all is that most employers may experience emotional breakdownafter pegging the issue on their performance. However, theadministration can deal will the matters of emotions by staying incontrol of the change process and handling the reactions at alllevels (Hayes,2014). Theboard can also have better ways of commenting on how the involvedofficials made the decision. More importantly, the management must besupportive and ready to offer positive counsels where applicable.

Summarily,week one was the first phase of the change management process thataimed to help in the layoff procedures after the company made adecision to outsource much of its production operations. Week twodiscussed the factors driving the need for the transformationalchange. There were discussions of theories of change management inthe fourth week. It was at this stage that the paper explored how themodels used in change management, including appreciative inquiry,Kotter’s theory, and action research, would be vital for thecompany through the redundancy. Finally, the fourth and fifth weekdiscussed communication and implementation plans respectively.

References

Clegg,S. R., (2015). Managing and organizations: An introduction to Theoryand Practice. Sage.

Chang,J. F. (2016). Business process management systems: strategy andimplementation. CRC Press.

Harmon,P. (2014). Business process change. Morgan Kaufmann.

Hayes,J. (2014).&nbspThetheory and Practice of Change Management.Palgrave Macmillan.

Jeston,J., &amp Nelis, J. (2014). Business process management. Routledge.

Rosemann,M., &amp vom Brocke, J. (2015). The six core elements of businessprocess management. In Handbook on Business Process Management 1(pp. 105-122). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.

Smith, Y. (2014). The Corporate Illogic of Outsourcing and Offshoring. Retrieved from Naked Capitalism: http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/07/corporate-illogic-outsourcing-offshoring.html

Wan, K. E. (2013). The Role of Leadership in Organisational Transformation. Retrieved from Civil Service College: https://www.cscollege.gov.sg/Knowledge/Pages/The-Role-of-Leadership-in-Organisational-Transformation.aspx

Implementation Plan for Transformational Change

ImplementationPlan for Transformational Change

ImplementationPlan for Transformational Change

Informingthe employees that their efforts may no longer be needed in thecompany will be one of the most problematic scenarios that themanagement is yet to experience. It will be difficult for theaffected staff members to understand the reason for the layoff(Clegg,2015).This last section will help as a guide to assist the management inmaneuvering through the process of downsizing with respect anddignity for both the parting and the remaining employees.

Majorimplementation steps

1.Executive Support for the Change

Itwill be vital that administration expresses support for the layoffand proves this when interacting and communicating with staff. Whenthe workers see their managers supporting the process, they will beable to develop a level of comfort for the actions involved in thedismissal (Clegg,2015).

2.Creating Instance for Change

Nomember of staff may want to participate in the change process withoutvalidation. Therefore, it will be significant to create a scenario tosupport the need for change. It may arise from various sources,including data gathered on rates of defect, client satisfactionsurveys, and budget pressures (Chang,2016).

3.Worker Involvement

Thechange effort will have to involve staffs at some level. Structuraltransformation, whether small or large, must be communicated andexplained, particularly those that that may affect how the personnelconducts their roles (Harmon,2014).

4.Notifying personnel about the Change

Communicationprocess needs to be logical and structured. Workers stand a chance ofmistreatment when the management fails to inform them regardingplanned changes. In a situation of poor notification through rumors,there can be resistance to the layoff (Clegg,2015).However, being positive in communication can lessen opposition andmake staffs feel that they are equally important.

Criteriafor Success

Therewill be a number of concerns that will have to be considered onredundancy process. First, the management will have to come up witha dismissal documentation that will outline the justification behindthe decision. The human resource manager will use the document tosupport details in employee letters (Smith,2014).Secondly, HRM will have to review facts in worksheets to certify thatall provisions of Collective Bargaining Agreement are considered. Incertain circumstances, it will be significant for the review to bedone prior to the time when the employees are informed. Third, theboard officials will have to meet with a human resource consultant soas to discuss any concerns, questions, or issues before commencingthe communication. It may assist the company to frame goodapproaches for assembling all essential possessions for the affectedstaff. Fourth, there will be the need to evaluate issues of changemanagement that may cause an impact on the remaining team (Harmon,2014).For instance, the roles that may have been finished by the positionsto be terminated will need to be moved. Fifth, the management willhave to alert the employees who are targeted for dismissal.Conventionally, an organization must always provide at least fourweeks for collective bargaining (Wan,2013). Sixth, the board officials will need to meet with the wholeworkforce to offer the justification and respond to any emergentquestions (Hayes,2014).It has to be done early enough after the meeting. Lastly, it will becrucial that the management constantly follows up with employeesbefore and after the period of downsizing to guarantee that everymatter is addressed swiftly (Rosemann&amp vom Brocke, 2015).

Rollout

Inmost occasions, employees are faced with risks in the course ofchange implementation. The obstacles can arise from employees ordepartments. Whenever an eventuality occurs, management has the roleof dealing with difficult or resistant employees. The personnel whoare affected may become defensive, resistant, and even bargain tohave another chance. Some of them may threaten the organization thatthey want to launch a formal action such as court case to retaliateagainst the idea of dismissal (Jeston&amp Nelis, 2014).They may turn to be possessively irritated with the management asthey contemplate the aftermaths arising from the job loss. The worseof all is that most employers may experience emotional breakdownafter pegging the issue on their performance. However, theadministration can deal will the matters of emotions by staying incontrol of the change process and handling the reactions at alllevels (Hayes,2014). Theboard can also have better ways of commenting on how the involvedofficials made the decision. More importantly, the management must besupportive and ready to offer positive counsels where applicable.

Summarily,week one was the first phase of the change management process thataimed to help in the layoff procedures after the company made adecision to outsource much of its production operations. Week twodiscussed the factors driving the need for the transformationalchange. There were discussions of theories of change management inthe fourth week. It was at this stage that the paper explored how themodels used in change management, including appreciative inquiry,Kotter’s theory, and action research, would be vital for thecompany through the redundancy. Finally, the fourth and fifth weekdiscussed communication and implementation plans respectively.

References

Clegg,S. R., (2015). Managing and organizations: An introduction to Theoryand Practice. Sage.

Chang,J. F. (2016). Business process management systems: strategy andimplementation. CRC Press.

Harmon,P. (2014). Business process change. Morgan Kaufmann.

Hayes,J. (2014).&nbspThetheory and Practice of Change Management.Palgrave Macmillan.

Jeston,J., &amp Nelis, J. (2014). Business process management. Routledge.

Rosemann,M., &amp vom Brocke, J. (2015). The six core elements of businessprocess management. In Handbook on Business Process Management 1(pp. 105-122). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.

Smith, Y. (2014). The Corporate Illogic of Outsourcing and Offshoring. Retrieved from Naked Capitalism: http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/07/corporate-illogic-outsourcing-offshoring.html

Wan, K. E. (2013). The Role of Leadership in Organisational Transformation. Retrieved from Civil Service College: https://www.cscollege.gov.sg/Knowledge/Pages/The-Role-of-Leadership-in-Organisational-Transformation.aspx