Reading Strategies

ReadingStrategies

Toincrease the reading efficiency of young students, it is critical todeploy strategies that are not only suitable for them, but also thosewhich align with their level of understanding (Perfetti &amp Adlof,5). Notably, children have different levels of mental abilities. Assuch, one strategy cannot be used for all, as this would prove to becounterproductive. According to Duke, et al. (54), some of thestrategies that can be devised to teaching reading comprehensioninclude a story map and a story frame.

StoryMap for “Handa`s Surprise: Read and Share” by Browne, Eileen

Thepurpose of a story map is to give young students a basicunderstanding of narratives and eventually enhance their textcomprehension. According to Filkins (2016), Average and poor studentswould benefit from this story, as they would be able to view theimages and connect them with the story. Notably, thelearning-disabled and low-achieving students would have a hard timetrying to figure out stories, which are not accompanied by visualrepresentations (Stringfield, Luscre &amp Gast, 220). As such, theirreading comprehension would improve significantly from this storymap.

StoryFrame

Inthis story, the problem starts when…

Afterthat…

Next…

Then,

Theproblem is finally solved when …

Thestory ends …

Thecharacters in the story were…

Thestory was interesting because…

Astory frame would be ideal for students who do not have any kind ofmental disability. This is because their level of comprehension ishigher and, as such, they would be able to understand the storywithout having to use the images (Berkeley, Mastropieri &ampScruggs, 18). Additionally, their level of intellect is higher makingthem able to picture the stories in their minds and hence, quicklycomprehend.

WorksCited

Berkeley,S., Mastropieri, M. A., &amp Scruggs, T. E. (2011). Readingcomprehension strategy instruction and attribution retraining forsecondary students with learning and other mild disabilities. Journalof Learning Disabilities,44(1),18-32.

Browne,Eileen. Handa`sSurprise. Read And Share. [Bilingual Urdu].Mantra Lingua, 2004. Print.

Duke,N., Pearson, D., Strachan, S., &amp Billman, A. (2011). Essentialelements of fostering and teaching reading comprehension. Whatresearch has to say about reading instruction,4,51-93.

Perfetti,C. A., &amp Adlof, S. M. (2012). Reading comprehension: A conceptualframework from word meaning to text meaning. Measuringup: Advances in how to assess reading ability,3-20.

Stringfield,S. G., Luscre, D., &amp Gast, D. L. (2011). Effects of a story mapon accelerated reader postreading test scores in students withhigh-functioning autism. Focuson Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities,26(4),218-229.

Filkins,S. (2016). Readingwith Purpose in the Content Areas – ReadWriteThink.readwritethink.org.Retrieved 4 November 2016, fromhttp://www.readwritethink.org/professional-development/strategy-guides/reading-with-purpose-content-30514.html