The Indian Farmers

TheIndian Farmers

TheIndian Farmers

Thechanges and control in land ownership impacted negatively on theIndian farmers during the British rule. Before the British invadedthe region, farming in India was primarily done for consumption. Inthis subsistence agriculture, people would grow crops in small ethnicsocieties and share with the non-agriculturalists. Barter trade wasthe predominant exchange mechanism. In other words, if a particularcommunity grew different crops, they would trade with another group.Any surplus foods were stored for later use. As such, the Indianfarmers had plenty of food to serve the family and the society as awhole. They grew food crops like bajra, pulses, and jowar. This paperwill discuss the impact of the British rule on the Indianagriculturalists.

However,with the invasion of the British, things changed drastically andfarming was commercialized. Indian farmers broke from thecommunity-designed agriculture to profitable techniques. Thealteration in land ownership mandated cultivators to pay for the landwhich led them to poverty. As such, monetization was propelled, andthe Indian farmers began growing cash crops like cotton, silk, opium,and indigo. Agricultural exports increased though it mainlybenefitted the British families. The resulting famine was instigatedby the adoption of cash crops over subsistence farming. The Indianfarmers produced great harvests that were exported to the benefit ofthe British business families. As such, the changes in landownership, economic and agricultural systems affected them leading tothe devastating famines in the region.

Inconclusion, as exemplified in this extract, the British rule causedadverse impacts on the Indian people. Before the invasion, Indiancommunities lived in harmony with plenty of food. However, theBritish system polarized the conventional farming methods andpropelled commercialization of agricultural products. The famine wascaused by insufficient food supplies rather a lack of it. The Indianfarmers became more enticed in making profits than feeding thecommunity via the influence of British masters.