THEORIES AND KNOWING SELF

4

PART 1

Question 1

Theories are important in that they give a structure or systematicmanner of understanding behaviors. Louise O’Neill deliberates uponher role in the protection of children as a social worker. She saysthat the behavioral and social theories are just a guide but thepersonal ability and power to interpret these issues is what matters(O`Neill, 2016). Therefore, a theory is the direction,and the therapist is the driver (Schirmer &amp Michailakis, 2013).

All the theories are rooted in an understandingof health behavior and social determinants of health. Thisis important because these are the issues around humans andany changes affect behavior and mental stability (Schirmer &ampMichailakis, 2013).

Reference

O`Neill, L. (2016).&nbspUsing theory in socialwork practice.&nbspTheGuardian. Retrieved 29 October 2016, fromhttps://www.theguardian.com/social-care-network/social-life-blog/2012/aug/03/using-theory-social-work-practice

Schirmer, W. &amp Michailakis, D. (2013). The Luhmannian approach toexclusion/inclusion and its relevance to Social Work.&nbspJournalOf Social Work,&nbsp15(1), 45-64.http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1468017313504607

Question 2

The e-source behavior and social sciences research journalstate that human social life issophisticated and underutilization of theories would compromise thefull objectives of psychological and social care (&quot9. ChallengesMoving Forward – Social and Behavioral Theories – e-Source Book -OBSSR e-Source&quot, 2016). Therefore, theoretical frameworks haveto be effectively utilized both in researchand care dispensation.

Sigmund Freud says misinterpretation of behavior could causedetrimental effects on the patient’s mind (Davidson, 2012). One wayof doing this is scolding a person who is using a defense mechanism.A theorist would know that these are inherentreactions that help someone cope with uncomfortable circumstances.Thus, therapists have to know that the pooruse of theories gives wrong judgment, andhence, weak interventions (&quot9.Challenges Moving Forward – Social and Behavioral Theories – e-SourceBook – OBSSR e-Source&quot, 2016).

References

9. Challenges Moving Forward – Social and Behavioral Theories -e-Source Book – OBSSR e-Source. (2016).&nbspEsourceresearch.org.Retrieved 29 October 2016, fromhttp://www.esourceresearch.org/Default.aspx?TabId=746

Davidson, M. (2012). Albert Memmi and Audre Lorde: Gender, Race, andthe Rhetorical Uses of Anger.&nbspJournal Of French AndFrancophone Philosophy,&nbsp20(1).http://dx.doi.org/10.5195/jffp.2012.546

PART 2

Question 1

One factor that impedes one to name own reality is cognitive bias.Naturally, people tend to focus on what benefits their mind andresolve to shun away from uncomfortable feelings or activities.However, the revelation of the hiddenthings helps define reality for somebody who may not understandthemselves. For instance, Kimaro’s aunts gave their narration ofrites of passage in A Lot Like You and it became an eye openerfor her Chagga culture (A Lot Like You, 2014).

The freedom of the mind is at stake if somebody does not definetheir reality (Lorde, 2016).The person will develop many unanswered questions,and life could be more difficult for them, asin the case of Kimaro. An environment of understanding andutilization of behavior therapies can be valuablein helping a group know their true identity (A Lot Like You,2014).

References

A Lot Like You. (2014). The United States.

Lorde, A. (2016).&nbspThe Uses of Anger on JSTOR.&nbspJstor.org.Retrieved 29 October 2016, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/40005441

Question 2

One big challenge on the journey of knowing oneself is theconfrontation of unknown realities. Kimaro explores her lineage inTanzania, and she concedes having troublesof anxiety in the new discoveries. Her aunts narrate sad stories ofintimidation and even though it is an eye opener, it takes astrong heart to listen to them. However, she ultimately findsthe sense of identity she was pursuing.

Another challenge is the consumption of time and money. Some peopleonly give up if something is exhaustingtheir finances and time (Lorde,2016). Eli Kimaro endures this journey and finally makes it.For sure, it took much of her time (ALot Like You, 2016).

The core of these challenges is the fact that migrations andadoption of the current cultures influence someone’s life. Kimarois of mixed race,and her life is rooted in the westernculture. Therefore, the traditional lineageis shut down (A Lot Like You, 2016). A Lot Like Youreflects the fact that despite her having led another life somewhereelse, Kimaro still finds her identity in the original culture, andtherefore, she is “a lot like them.”

References

A Lot Like You. (2014). The United States.

Lorde, A. (2016).&nbspThe Uses of Anger on JSTOR.&nbspJstor.org.Retrieved 29 October 2016, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/40005441