TV AND NEWSPAPER NEWS ANALYSIS Lecturer

TVAND NEWSPAPER NEWS ANALYSIS

Lecturer

AnOutline of 30 Minutes TV News

Time: Minutes

News Item

Detail

0 – 1

Headlines

Major activities happening around the country

1 – 2

News anchors together with field correspondents following on the news items on the headlines introduced.

Segment News anchors are introduced as well.

2-8

Leading news story

Mostly Politics and sad events like crimes, calamities, and war

8-10

Commercial break

LG-Electronics, PayPal, Lexus

10-16

Business News

Major events from the stock exchange

16-19

Commercial break

Southwest Airlines, Toshiba Kira,

19-25

Feature story

Mostly events that are related by a majority of Americans. An interview is also show cased around the feature story.

26-28

Commercial break

Colgate, Red Bull, Kellogg`s Froot Loops

28-30+

Sports News

NBA, NFL, Baseball etc.

NewspaperOutline

Page Number

Local News

(Local politics and other local events)

National News.

(Presidential and congress news)

Editorials

(Opinions on politics and the socioeconomic trends))

International News

(War on terrorism,

Business

(Mergers, Stock exchange reports)

Lifestyle, Sports &amp Entertainment

(Health, Games &amp Celebrity news)

Classifieds &amp Obituaries

Advertisements

1-6

7-15

16-24

25-32

33-41

39-45

46-50

1-50

Thetable above covers the general outline of news content in a typicalAmerican newspaper with their corresponding number of pages.Advertisements normally feature throughout the different newssegments from cover to cover. On average, there are four full-pageadvertisements, five more advertisements half page size and about adozen other smaller Ad prints.

HowMuch News Is Really In The News!

Theprofusion of news from social media which has been a source ofinstant news means that people no longer have to wait for tomorrow’spapers to be kept abreast of events that transpired today. Thusnewspaper journalists are forced to provide in-depth information onwhat is no longer news.

Alot of questions have been raised concerning the integrity of themainstream media. Biased coverage is a major accusation that TVstations, in particular, cannot escape from. The modern economicdesign of the media has been blamed for influencing how and what newsis reported. For instance, the TV viewer at times receives subjectiveimages the cameraman has decided to focus his lens on. This viewcontrasts with that which the human eye is able to see. TV has alsobeen accused of sparking public discussions that are fashioned alongcertain socio-political and economic dogma. These discussions arebacked by powerful associations in society to mold public beliefs,understanding as well as attitudes [ CITATION Cat13 l 2057 ]Media experts and some viewers are hencedissatisfied by the irrelevant and superficial information that is aresult of compromised accurate coverage. A notable example of acontrolled public discussion is the concerns the issue of climatechange. It has recently been given subjective coverage. It has beencovered in a manner that casts uncertainty over the topic and as aresult, viewers loose interest.

Uponthe interrogation of various explanatory schemes informing newsitems, we learn that the mainstream media cover some events with anaim of attracting advertisement revenues. This in effect makes thecoverage a scripted report. Since the media is recognized as thefourth estate after the legislature, executive and judiciary, it isexpected to play the role of the proverbial watch dog since theyoccupy the position of trustees as they use public airwaves and thepublic is the beneficiary.The Media should impartially cover news and events while having thepeople’s interests at heart.

References

Catherine Happer, G. P. (2013). The Role of the Media in the Construction of Public Belief and Social Change. Journal of Social and Political Psychology, 1(1), 321-327. Retrieved October 23, 2016, from http://jspp.psychopen.eu/article/view/96/37